S/V Blue Max

Well I finally found the right boat project for me.  I've been wanting to buy my own boat for years (too many to count), but finding the right one and meeting all my requirements was the challenge.  Who knew that when I started my new job with the Navy, the right door would open. 

One of the people I work with had a boat sitting on a trailer for the last ten years in the RV storage area on the base.  When he heard that I was into sailing, he came over to my office and we started talking about sailboats and he told me about his.  When he mentioned he might want to get rid of it, I told him I would take a look at it and let him know if I was interested.

The boat is a Albin Vega 27 that was made in Sweden in 1975.  I had never heard of the boat and did a little research.  It turns out that the Vega is a great little pocket cruiser and people have sailed them across the Atlantic and the Pacific, and not just once or twice.  So, now I knew the boat could do what I wanted, but was this the boat?  After looking at the boat, and seeing beyond the accumulation of dirt and debris, I found that the boat itself was in solid shape.  It had never been left in salt water for any length of time and only had a little over 700 hours on the original motor.

The deal was struck.  The more I read about the Vega, the more I wanted it.  Now mind you, this is a fixer-upper and I know that going into it, but I got her for a song, including the trailer.  We have an RV pad on the lower portion of our property where she will live while she's being worked on.

The pictures below show her state when I bought her and I will chronicle in pictures all the work  I do to bring her back to life.  You may look at the first set of pictures and think that I'm crazy.  Aside from your probably being right about the crazy part, only time will tell. 

I think I've decided on a name, Blue Max.  It was the nickname my son was called on the football field by his teammates.

Anyhow, I hope you enjoy the pictures and can see the possibilities as I see them.


Pictures at time of purchase - Click on the first picture to open the viewer...
Line drawings of the Vega.  The 1st is the way it was designed and the 2nd shows the Nav Station and refrigerator that I will install as I completely redo the inside. - Click on the first picture to open the viewer...
I spent several weeks getting the boat ready to make the short trailer ride from the storage lot to the house.  It has been sitting for 10 years and I needed to make sure the trailer was up for the move, as well as make sure the mast made the journey safely also.  These photos show the prep work and the move home as well as the jack stands I purchased to lift the boat up off the trailer and the varnishing/storage shed I built next to the boat.
Both the bow & stern cradles had rotted away, so I needed to fabricate new ones.  These were made with 4x4s, epoxy glue and lag screws.Fortunately there was enough of the old stern cradle left for me to copy the slot to route out.  Both fit the rails just right and hold the mast very snug.I also had to put new tail lights and wiring in place to make us legal.While I probably didn’t have to do it, I also put tie down straps on the trailer posts.  They look sturdy, and probably are, it’s hard to tell what damage  the rust may have done below the surface.  Not that the straps would hold much, but hey they weren’t being used on anything else.Well here she is; new tires, lights, cradles and all.  Next stop, the RV pad at the house.Making the trip to the houseMaking the trip to the houseGetting backed down the drivewayGetting backed down the drivewayBlue Max set up on its pad where it will live while being redone.Blue Max set up on its pad where it will live while being redone.Tarp in place on FrameTarp in place on Frame10/29/10 - Jack Stands put in place and boat raised up about 8 inches above trailer.10/29/10 - Jack Stands put in place and boat raised up about 8 inches above trailer.1/2/11 – While varnishing the starboard main bulkhead in the garage, the fumes were getting into the house so I had to stop varnishing in the garage.  This prompted me to stop working on the boat for a few days while I built this 8x10 shed to both store boat stuff and provide a place to varnish.
Anchor Windless - To rebuild the v-berth I needed to know the position the anchor windless chain pipe would be so I had to start by building out the base for the windless on the foredeck.
2/5/11 – Foredeck area where the anchor windlass will be mounted.  Part of the windlass base hangs over the center raised portion so the deck has to be built up.2/5/11 – Foredeck area where the anchor windlass will be mounted.  A plywood base matching the windlass base is made and covered with glad wrap so epoxy won’t stick to it.2/5/11 – Foredeck area where the anchor windlass will be mounted.  Thickened epoxy adhesive is placed between the deck and the base plate.2/5/11 – Foredeck area where the anchor windlass will be mounted.  Epoxy hardened and ready for sanding.2/5/11 – Foredeck area where the anchor windlass will be mounted.  Epoxy sanded and ready for finish coat.2/5/11 – Foredeck area where the anchor windlass will be mounted.  Epoxy finish coat applied.1/17/14 - The pad for the anchor windless is painted and ready for drilling the chain hole.  The stainless steel sheet will be epoxied in place to protect the deck from the chain.3/22/14 - I had originally removed the bow water tank to use the area for the chain locker.  I realized that I could cut the top off the water tank and control the water and debris from the chain and rode.  I will screen the drain and run the hose into the bilge.4/26/14 - I decided to go with a manual windlass instead of the electric I built the pad for, after finding a brand new manual windlass, that’s not made anymore, on ebay.  I had to modify the pad for the different base and drilled all the holes bigger to fill with epoxy.4/26/14 - It’s hard to tell, but the area between the upper and lower layers of fiberglass have been dug back so that area can be filled with thickened epoxy.  This seals the inner foam core from moisture and keeps the deck from being compressed together when the bolts are tightened. 4/27/14 - Holes taped on the underside and filled with epoxy with an adhesive thickener mixed in.  It was left pretty runny to allow it to fill into the deck area that was dug out between the fiberglass layers. 5/2/14 - Thickened epoxy with a fairing filler was applied to the surface of the holes and then sanded smooth after it dried. 5/2/14 - Mounting and chain holes drilled.  The chain hole needed to be oblong, so I used adhesive backed sandpaper wrapped around a small hole saw to contour the hole as needed. 5/9/14 - Base to hold the bottom of the haws pipe and access panel.5/9/14 - Lid to anchor locker access cut, fitted and ready for varnishing.5/9/14 -  Backing plate for windlass made from 1” thick mahogany.  Trough cut around chain hole for hawse pipe to sit in.  Hawse pipe made from 3” plumbing PVC and 2.5” electrical PVC. 5/9/14 - Backing plate for windlass in place with the hawse pipe in place between the backing plate and chain locker.  The two hose clamps allow adjustment to tighten the pipe and hold it in place.  The backing plate and pipes will be painted white.5/10/14 - Manual windlass put in place to ensure all the bolts line up.
Trailer -->
Repairing the Handrail Holes and Installing Stainless Steel Handrails
8/13/11 – The previous owner removed the teak handrails to protect them, but didn’t seal the holes.  They were left open and water seeped into the plywood core and caused a lot of dry rot.8/13/11 – I used a tapered bit to drill out each hole from the outside.  This left a small hole on the inside that was easily sealed.8/13/11 – Here you can see holes where the dry rot was minimal and the plywood is intact.8/13/11 –And here is a close-up of hole where the plywood was rotted away.  I used this small round file, with a point, to dig out what rotted wood I could.8/13/11 – Here you can see the port side drilled and cleaned out.8/14/11 – Here you can see the starboard side holes taped over on the inside.  I used Gorilla Tape which is like duct tape on steroids.8/14/11 – Once the tape backing was in place, I poured penetrating epoxy the consistency of water into each hole until it was full.  This used a lot of epoxy and was a little messy.  I let it soak in for about twenty minutes then used a syringe to suck the excess out that didn’t soak into the wood.8/20/11 – After letting the Penetrating epoxy fully cure, I mixed up regular West epoxy with adhesive filler to a consistency between syrup and molasses so that it would easily flow into all of the crevices, filling the gap between the inner and outer fiberglass laminates. 8/20/11 – Here is a shot of the port side with all of the holes filled with the adhesive epoxy.  The new stainless steel handrails are lying next to the old holes being filled in.8/21/11 – After letting the adhesive epoxy cure overnight, I sanded and prepped the holes to receive the final coat of sanding (finish) epoxy.  I used a Dremel Tool with a small round grinding ball to rough up the surface in each hole that I couldn’t get the tip of the sander into.8/21/11 – I used the same West epoxy with just a different filler to create the final coat.  This was mixed to almost the consistency of warm peanut butter so that it flowed easily and held its shape.8/21/11 – The sanding epoxy has been spread over each of the holes.8/21/11 – The sanding epoxy has been sanded smooth with the surface and that strip of the cabin roof prepared for a coat of linear polyurethane two part primer.9/11/11 - Holes were measured and drilled and the handrails put in place.  They'll come back off for primer and paint and wood handrails need to be made to match up on the inside.9/18/11 - A shot of the boat with the handrails in place and the old tarp canopy removed.  I'm having a steel carport installed for better protection.
Installing the new compass - The hole from the old compass was about 3/4 of an inch larger than the hole needed for the new compass.  I made two rings out of 4mm marine plywood to put on the inside and outside to adjust the size of the hole.
8/25/11 - These rings were cut at 8" diameter and then taped together and the pattern for the new compass cut from the center.  Both then sealed with penetrating epoxy.8/25/11 - Old compass hole sanded and preped.8/25/11 - Old compass hole sanded and preped.9/4/11 - Outside ring epoxied and clamped in place.9/4/11 - Inside ring epoxied  in place.9/5/11 - A shot of the gap between the two rings that needs to be filled in.9/5/11 - A shot of the gap between the two rings filled in with thinckened epoxy.9/10/11 - Compass set in place to check fit.9/10/11 - Compass set in place to check fit.9/10/11 - Inside view of compass.  Varnished plywood panel still need to be put in place before Compass is fully mounted.
Installing the new carport over the boat.
9/23/11 -  Building out the carport9/24/11 - I moved the shed back to the edge of the concrete  so  that the doors opened fully.  I also hung part of the old tarp over the shed and one side for shade.
Removing the MD6A Diesel Engine
10/29/11 - Used pneumatic cut-off saw to cut through prop shaft.  If I wanted to save the shaft I would have had to take the transmission apart.  This was much easier.  The arrow points to where the shaft was cut through at.10/29/11 - The prop and the shaft just slid right out once the shaft was cut.10/30/11 - All the wireing has been removed from above the engine.10/30/11 - The port side bulkheads removed to get to the engine mount bolts.10/30/11 - Engine mount bolts removed.  Alternator and starter removed to lighten the engine and make it less bulky.11/5/11 - I put a support frame for the hoist in place using 12 ft. long 4x4s attached to the carport supports and 2" steel pipe sitting on top of the 4x4s.11/5/11 - I attached the hook from the hoist to the alternator bracket at the front of the engine and lifted the engine just enough to slide the engine forward until the lifting bracket on the engine was clear.11/5/11 - The engine attached at the lifting bracket to the hoist and being lifted out.  It's a 1 ton hoist, so it was no effort for me to lift the engine out by myself.11/5/11 - The engine being slid through the camponion way entrance.11/5/11 - The engine sitting in the cockpit on a piece of plywood supported by four 2x3s.11/6/11 - Hoist Frame moved to next carport frame back and engine hoisted up.11/6/11 - Hoist Frame moved to next carport frame back and engine hoisted up.11/6/11 - Engine on the ground.11/6/11 - Engine compartment after removing engine.11/6/11 - Engine compartment after cleaning.
Main Cabin Rebuild
5/22/10 - Looking forward.  The port settee now completed removed.5/22/10 - Looking aft.  The port settee now completed removed.5/23/10 - Behind the old electrical panel - Pretty scary stuff...9/3/10 – After picking up a 9mm thick sheet of Joubert Okoume marine plywood, I used the old main bulkhead as a template and cut out a new bulkhead.9/5/10 – Using a small piece of the 9mm thick sheet of Joubert Okoume marine plywood, I made a new bilge cover and coated it with penetrating epoxy for the first coat and will finish it with varnish.  The Joubert Okoume is a light colored African Mahogany.9/25/10 - Old windows are removed.  The new windows are a little larger than the openings so I'll have to grind the openings out a little.10/15/10 - Using two Shower Curtain holders to hold backing plate in place while the holes are drilled.10/23/10 - Inside shot of the completed port main cabin window12/11/10 – The starboard main bulkhead is cut out and now fitted for installation.  This is a picture of it clamped in place.  It will be varnished then installed.1/23/11 - The new port side main bulkhead after being installed.  It has 6 coats of varnish on each side.8/7/11 - The main cabin with the hardware removed from the ceiling and walls and ready to sand.8/7/11 - The port side sanded with the power sander.  Once the starboard side is done it's time for hand sanding.8/7/11 - The Galley area on the ports side scrubbed clean and ready to sand before painting.9/10/11 - New wire pulled through ducts in the ceiling for the new cabin lights.9/10/11 - New wire pulled through ducts in the ceiling for the cabin lights switch.9/11/11 - Old holes in the ceiling touched up with thickened sanding epoxy.9/11/11 - First batch of sanding epoxy applied to the ceiling drop at the front of the cabin.  This is to hide the texture of the fiberglass that was just painted over.9/11/11 - 2nd batch of sanding epoxy applied.  This will be sanded smooth to match the rest of the ceiling, then painted.10/9/11 - The first coat of epoxy primer paint on the ceiling.  The sides by the windows aren't being painted because they're being covered in wood.10/29/11 - Ceiling with coat 3rd coat of Brightside (final) on it.11/26/11 - Port side prepped and ready for dinette build out.  Carpet installed on side and will be installed below once dinette seat bulkheads are in place.11/26/11 - Port side prepped and ready for dinette build out.  Carpet installed on side and will be installed below once dinette seat bulkheads are in place.12/2/11 - 4 mm spacer strips glued in place so that wire can be fed behind panel.  Staples were used to hold the stirps in place until the epoxy dried, then removed.12/2/11 - 4 mm spacer strips glued in place so that wire can be fed behind panel.  Staples were used to hold the stirps in place until the epoxy dried, then removed.12/3/11 - Cardboard being used to create a template for the panels.12/4/11 - Backing plywood and spacer strips sealed in penetrating epoxy.12/4/11 - Backing plywood and spacer strips sealed in penetrating epoxy.12/4/11 - Back panels cut out, fitted and backs sealed in penetrating epoxy.12/11/11 - While waiting for the penetrating epoxy to fully dry on the cockpit wall panels, I cut out the bulkhead that goes between the galley and cockpit locker and the front panel for the port galley.  Both got a coat of penetrating epoxy on one side.12/18/11 - Rear cabin panels installed and ready for sanding and varnishing.  Also, compass and compass light wiring installed.12/24/11 - The rear panels with the first two coats of varnish on.12/30/11 - The rear main cabin panels with 5 coats of varnish and the bulkhead between the port galley and cockpit locker installed.  The bulkhead has 2 coats of epoxy primer and two coats of Brightside white paint.12/31/11 - The front panel for the port galley, and support for the steps, built out and its first coat of varnish.1/7/12 - Laying a bead of thickened epoxy along the base to form a rounded corner for the fiberglass cloth.  Cellophane tape keeps the epoxy from sticking to the wood template.1/8/12 - 3 layers of fiberglass epoxied over the rounded corner.1/8/12 - Both fiberglass lips in place to support the dinette seat bulkheads.1/15/12 - Galley bulkheads in place.1/16/12 - The first two Sipo strips are in place over the fiberglass covered plywood spacers.  They still need to be varnished.1/28/12 - Sipo strips cut and screwed in place and ready for varnishing.  Below is the bulkhead between the galley and dinette held in place for alignment.1/28/12 - Sipo strips cut and screwed in place and ready for varnishing.1/28/12 - Bulkheads for the galley and dinette seat being lined up.1/29/12 - Galley front panel set in place to align bulkhead.  Galley front panel still needs 3 more coats of varnish before it's ready to be installed.2/14/12 - Port side sipo wood strips around window varnished and installed.2/14/12 - Port side sipo wood strips around window varnished and installed.2/14/12 - Port side sipo wood strips around window varnished and installed.3/10/12 - Building out the aft dinette seat with 3 drawers.  Face cutout for drawers, put in place, and bottom drawer lined up to mount rails.3/11/12 - Bottom drawer mounted on rails and divider installed.4/22/12 – All 3 drawers are built and installed under the aft dinette seat.  The bottom drawer with 6 coats of varnish on faceplate.  The middle drawer with unvarnished faceplate.  The top drawer before faceplate installed.4/29/12 - Forward Dinette seat framed in and outside panel ready for varnishing.  Access will be through a hole in the top when complete.5/6/12 - Drawers finished and installed.5/20/12 - Top of drawer cabinet painted white (will be under cushion) and outside seat back cut and fitted.6/10/12 – Outside dinette back panels and shelves varnished and installed.  Wiring and antenna coax installed adjacent to the deck/hull seam.6/10/12 – Trim panel covering deck/hull seam and wiring varnished and installed.6/11/12 – Vertical dividers/shelve supports cut and put in place to check fitting.6/12/12 - Center panel and radio shelf cut and fitted.6/16/12 – Gluing 2” mahogany and birch strips together to make dinette table.6/17/12 – dinette table, without fiddles or varnish sitting next to where it will be mounted. 6/24/12 - Shelf installed to hold Ham radio, power meter and stereo (stereo not in picture). Back panel that attaches to back of shelf is lowered to access electrical.6/29/12 - Shelf installed to hold Ham radio, power meter and stereo. Back panel that attaches to back of shelf hides the electrical and hold two 12v adaptors.7/6/12 - Divider/support panel in place.7/7/12 - Storage compartment built out.7/8/12 - Stainless steel stove compartment installed.7/22/12 - Galley shelves installed and top trim and door rail guides fitted and reday for final sanding and varnish.8/5/12 - Shot of the port side galley with the cupboard doors installed.  Also shows the first piece of the new countertop in place.  I’m using eighth inch glass tiles for the top.  The tiles are just set in place and have not been glued or grouted yet.  You can also see part of the temp ladder.8/17/12 - The countertop pieces are tiled and grouted.  I still need to paint the border wood white and put the front trim molding on.  You can see where I cut out one tile for a finger hole in each of the lids.9/1/12 - Port side dinette with countertop finished.  Also cabin light wired and installed.9/22/12 - Table finished and installed.  A metal leg needs to be cut and installed to finish it.9/3/12 - The starboard side of the main cabin removed for replacement.10/6/12 - Starboard forward main cabin bulkhead bolted in place and gap below filled in with thickened epoxy.10/8/12 – 1/8 inch thick stainless steel plate cut out and epoxied to 12mm marine plywood.  This is a beefed up support arch to assist in distributing the load from the mast step.  It works in conjunction with the one inch hardwood arch (on the main cabin side) and the 12mm marine plywood bulkheads.10/8/12 – 1/8 inch thick stainless steel plate cut out and epoxied to 12mm marine plywood.10/12/12 –12mm marine plywood support epoxied to the one inch hardwood arch (on the main cabin side).  The bulkheads are also epoxied to the hardwood arch.10/12/12 – 1/8 inch thick stainless steel plate and 12mm marine plywood epoxied and bolted to the bulkheads and one inch hardwood arch.  Six 3/8 inch stainless steel bolts were used.10/12/12 – 1/8 inch thick stainless steel plate and 12mm marine plywood epoxied and bolted to the bulkheads and one inch hardwood arch.  Six 3/8 inch stainless steel bolts were used.10/26/12 - Starboard side aft.  The seacocks are for the galley.  The small one is the sea water inlet and the large one is the sink drain.10/27/12 - Old thru hull hole for the engine water cooling.  To be sealed over.10/27/12 - Old thru hull hole for the mechanical knot log.  To be sealed over.11/10/12 - Pulling new wire through the molded in conduit that runs from the cockpit locker to the head along the starboard side.11/10/12 – I was able to fit six #16 wires and two #14 wires into the conduit.11/10/12 – The six #16 wires are for LED masthead tri-color, steaming and deck lights.  The two #14 wires are for lights and fans on the starboard side.11/16/12 - Forward half of starboard settee installed.  I'm using hatches on top instead of sliding front panels so it is easier to pack and store things.11/16/12 - Starboard galley framed in.  Front panel just clamped in place and will need to be removed to install fridge and sink.11/25/12 - Starboard galley countertop fitted in place.  I decided to use Formica for the surface instead of tile because it would be too hard to tile around the openings for the fridge and sink.  Gluing on the Formica (with epoxy) and trimming it was pretty easy once I got the hang of it.12/1/12 - Starboard galley countertop set up in garage and connected to 12v power supply to ensure it worked before installing it.  Also shows the wooden frame I built to hold the lid in place.12/1/12 - Starboard galley countertop in place with fridge installed.  Wooden frame for lid also installed.  In the bottom of the picture you can see the new foot pumps I installed for the sink water.12/1/12 - Starboard galley countertop in place with fridge installed with lid in place.12/2/12 - Starboard galley fridge lid frame with 2 coats of primer.12/9/12 - Fridge with trim to hold lid in place completed, painted and sealed.12/9/12 - Compressor mounted on opposite side of bulkhead from the fridge  in the cockpit locker.12/22/12 - Counter with fridge, sink water spouts and rear cupboard installed.1/4/13 - Outside storage for forward starboard settee installed.1/26/13 - Outside storage for starboard settee installed.  Entry step completed and slid in place.2/3/13 - Shot of entryway set in place.  It still needs some hinges and alignment, but it came out very nice.  The top step lifts off and the panel with the second step slides out for access to the batteries.2/3/13 - The electrical panel will fold down forward for access.  Once the cabinet is permanently installed and the hinges are in place.  I'll start wiring the panel.  The large 50a breaker top left is for the anchor windless.  The 30a breaker below it is for the HAM radio gear and VHF.4/28/13 - Starboard side of main cabin.  Additional wiring for AC and windlass in hand made harness.  AC breakers located above cabinet.4/28/13 - Two of the four 6v batteries in place.  Battery Charger installed.4/28/13 - Update to Electric Panel.  Simple voltage display replaced with battery bank monitor that can monitor up to 3 banks of batteries.  Also replaced 4 breaker panel with 6 breaker panel for enough breakers to cover tri-color.6/1/13 - Port side countertop tile replaced with Formica to match other side.6/1/13 - Port side countertop tile replaced with Formica to match other side.2/1/14 - Installed the inside handrails to the backing blocks for the outside handrails.4/21/14 - I got the cushions back from the upholsterer today and installed them.  I’m still waiting on the v-berth cushions.4/21/14 - I got the cushions back from the upholsterer today and installed them.  I’m still waiting on the v-berth cushions.9/22/14 - Gally counter trim varnished and glued in place.
V-Berth Rebuild
Removing the forward berth and chain lockerRemoving the forward berth and chain locker.  You can see the fresh water tank.7/14/10 - The bow of the boat with the water tank removed and the bulkhead coverings removed.  Some light sanding and I will paint the anchor locker, and under the water tank with bilge paint.7/14/10 - The bow of the boat with the water tank removed and the bulkhead coverings removed.  Some light sanding and I will paint the anchor locker, and under the water tank with bilge paint.9/3/10 - 3 of the bulkheads are now out.  I'll leave the 4th in place until I replace the one across from it because it supports the deck.9/12/10 - After filling cracks along the edge of the inside of the deck with epoxy adhesive, then running two inch wide fiberglass tape epoxied in place along the edges to reinforce the area that developed the cracks, the roof of the v-berth got two coats of paint.9/15/10 - The replacement windows I ordered from the Great Britain Vega Association came in and will get installed in the next couple of weeks.9/25/10 - Old windows are removed.  The new windows are a little larger than the openings so I'll have to grind the openings out a little.9/25/10 - Old windows are removed.  The new windows are a little larger than the openings so I'll have to grind the openings out a little.10/11/10 - Window installed with sealant overflow oozing out.  I used extra sealant to insure a complete seal.10/11/10 - Extra sealant removed10/11/10 - Area around window sanded and ready to paint.10/23/10 - Inside shot of the completed port forward windows1/30/11 – Closet bulkhead getting varnished in the shed.1/30/11 – Closet bulkhead getting varnished in the shed.2/12/11 – Anchor locker bulkhead cut out and fitted in place.2/13/11 – Indoor/Outdoor carpet rough cut and put in place.2/13/11 – Indoor/Outdoor carpet port wall in the V-Birth trimmed and glued in place.2/26/11 - V-Berth Anchor Locker Cover in place.  Starboard hull carpet glued in place.2/27/11 - Second bulkhead (between closet & v-berth) on port side installed.  4x4 post is pushing hull outward so brace can be installed.2/27/11 - Cardboard "V" support used to shape fiberglass stiffener on hull where jack stands and trailer support rail rest.3/5/11 - Shot of v-berth with forward bulkhead sitting in place.  I must finish nav light wiring and mount new cleat before bolting in place.3/13/11 - Final fitting of the forward bulkhead after the navigation light wiring is completed and the new cleat is mounted. (The access panel lid is off.)3/26/11 - Bulkhead between v-berth and head cut out and fitted in place.3/27/11 - v-berth/lower storage panels being epoxy glued to framing.5/28/11 - Bulkhead between head and v-berth bolted into place.6/4/11 - Final base support panels assembled and put in place.6/4/11 - Final base support panels assembled and put in place.6/4/11 - Final base support panels assembled and put in place.6/18/11 - All the plywood pieces for the v-berth are finished and in place, waiting for the trim.  The trim on the two bulkheads is the old trim that I put in place to make sure they fit before I make new ones.7/2/11 - Hardwood trim being aligned prior to being mounted with screws and epoxy.7/2/11 - Hardwood trim mounted from behind with screws and ready to be varnished.7/30/11 - Shot of finished trim for v-berth with final coats of varnish applied7/30/11 - Shot of finished trim for v-berth with final coats of varnish applied5/2/14 - V-Berth cushions made and installed.
Adding New Anchor Roller
7/23/10 – Shot of the bow of the boat and the bow pulpit.  The bow plate needs to come off so I can mount the double bow roller.  I’m doing this work now because the bow of the boat on the inside is completely open and I can get to the nuts.7/23/10 – Shot of the bow of the boat and the bow pulpit.  Top View.7/23/10 – Shot of the new bow roller and bow plate.  I had to go with a new bow plate because it sits on top of the bow roller and bolts to it instead of the deck.7/23/10 – Shot of the bow with the old bow plate removed.  I had to remove the water fill plate because it protruded about 3” below the deck and was in the way of removing the nuts.  It needs to be cleaned and resealed anyway so now was a good time to remove it.7/23/10 – Shot of the new bow roller and bow plate sitting in place to make sure everything fits.7/23/10 – Shot of the new bow roller and bow plate sitting in place to make sure everything fits.7/23/10 – Shot of the 3 holes I enlarged and filled.  I didn't get them filled quite enough and will have to do a second pass when I fill the spider cracks I had to grind out.7/23/10 – Shot of the spider cracks and cracks under the bow plate that I had to grind out so they could be filled with epoxy.7/27/10 - Spider and bow cracks after they have been filled with epoxy and sanded down.7/27/10 - Shot of the bow after the second coat of epoxy was applied and sanded, and the 4 other holes for the bow roller drilled.  After a final sanding it will be ready to prime and paint.8/1/10 - Bow with cracks ground out, filled with epoxy and sanded down.8/1/10 - Bow with cracks ground out, filled with epoxy and sanded down.8/1/10 - Forward deck, where bow roller is to be mounted, sanded and primed.8/13/10 - The bow with 3 coats of finish paint and ready for bow roller.8/15/10 - Bow Roller sealed and bolted in place.8/15/10 - Bow Roller sealed and bolted in place.8/15/10 - A view of the bolts and backing plates holding the bow roller in place.3/13/11 - Shot of the bow of the deck with the old anchor rope pipe and old cleat removed, their holes filled with epoxy and the new cleat mounted.  You can also see the new wires for the navigation lights.
Head Rebuild
4/10/10 - Head before toilet and sink removed.The head with the toilet removedThe head with the toilet removed.  You can see the old holding tank in the background.Holding tank, platform and shelf removed from head compartment.10/24/10 - Removing the old thru-hulls for the head10/30/10 - Old thru-hull for head discharge finally removed with boat lifted up off of the trailer rails10/30/10 - Roving core between fiberglass layers ground out with a Dremel rotary saw blade about a half inch back10/30/10 - Outside of thru-hull hole covered with tape to hold epoxy in10/30/10 - Thru-hull hole packed with thickened epoxy in the sandwich core area to strengthen the hull area and seal the core so water can’t seep in and rot the core10/31/10 – Thru-hull hole drilled to new diameter (1 ¾ “), about a half an inch diameter larger than the old hole.10/31/10 - Two support rings to fit between the thru-hull and the valve.  They provide extra support to the area and a solid structure to attach the valve to.  They were made from Sipo wood and sealed with penetrating epoxy.5/14/11 -  The water intake and waste discharge thru-hulls finished.5/28/11 - Bulkhead between head and v-berth bolted into place.11/9/13 - Head Compartment with plywood template for toilet base cut to fit around thru-hull.11/16/13 - Hole cut in forward bulkhead for toilet water intake hose.11/16/13 - Compartment under v-berth showing thru-hull and water intake hose.11/16/13 - Toilet sitting in place on base template.11/23/13 - Cardboard mock up of the holding tank to confirm size for template.11/23/13 - Holding tank front, sides, top and bottom cut out in plywood and fitted together.11/23/13 - Plywood tank checked for fit.11/23/13 - Tank front, sides and bottom epoxied together.  Molding used to round and strengthen corners.  Holes cut in front for measuring how full tank is.11/29/13 - Thickened epoxy used to fill in and around corners.  Sanded and ready for fiberglass.11/30/13 - Front sides and bottom with fiberglass epoxied in place.  A second piece of 4 inch wide fiberglass epoxied over the holes for added strength.11/30/13 - Back of tank epoxied in place.12/2/13 - Finished fiberglassed inside of holding tank.12/2/13 - Test to make sure tank doesn't leak and determine how much the tank holds.  It will hold 18 gallons, not that you would want to fill it that high.12/8/13 - All plumbing in place and ready for holding tank.12/27/13 - Holding tank installed and all hoses connected.  Toilet functions and no leaks.12/27/13 - Shot of plumbing below tank.12/27/13 - Shot of plumbing above tank.1/11/14 - Making the trim for the bulkheads.  1/11/14 - Making the trim for the bulkheads.  1/11/14 - Making the trim for the bulkheads.
Cockpit hole repair - There was an old mechanical speed indicator mounted on the forward cockpit hull and when I removed it, it left a 3 inch hole going into the main cabin.  These pictures are of grinding a taper around the edge of the hole, putting a cellophane covered backing on the inside, filling the hole with epoxy filler and then covering with 3 layers of fiberglass cloth.  Epoxy fairing compound will be used to finish it off for sanding and painting.
11/27/11 - The hole after removing the old speed indicator.11/27/11 - The edges of the hole ground out at a taper and a backing plate in place.11/27/11 - Hole filled in with epoxy adhesive filler to taper the edges of the hole to the backing plate.11/27/11 - 3 layers of fiberglass cloth epoxied in place.12/2/11 - First coat of epoxy sanding filler applied.12/3/12 - First coat of epoxy filler sanded and ready for finish coat.
Workshop - A couple of shots of my workshop with the new band saw and table for my router.
Replacing the Port Side Chainplates
6/8/12 - Pulling out the old chainplates because they are badly bent up..  The aft chaneplate has been removed.6/8/12 - A shot of the aluminum channel under the deck that reinforces the chainplates.  Surprisingly, there was no galvanic corrosion between the aluminum and the stainless steel chainplates, washers and bolts.6/8/12 - A shot of the 3 old chainplates after being removed. 6/8/12 – The fiberglass around the chainplate holes has been sanded and two coats of LP primer applied. 6/9/12 – The first new chainplate being installed.  I got a little carried away with the Butyl  sealant.6/9/12 – The first new chainplate fully tightened down.  The excess Butyl sealant can be removed and reused.6/9/12 – The chainplates installed and excess sealant cleaned off. 6/9/12 – The chainplates installed and excess sealant cleaned off. 6/9/12 – The chainplates installed and excess sealant cleaned off.
Hanging Closet / Storage Closet
What was a hanging closet on the port side, between the v-berth and the main closet, was poorly designed with just a  storage area at the bottom where stuff could be dumped in.  It's being replaced with four 3" high drawers at the bottom and three mesh shelves above the drawers that can hold clothes and still allow air flow.
6/2/13 - Storage closet area before build out.6/2/13 - Plywood face with drawer slots cut out.7/8/13 - Closet drawer frame and rails in place.7/26/13 - Cover to drawer varnished and in place.
Sanding and painting of the Deck
7/28/13 - Sanding and primering of coach roof.7/28/13 - Sanding and primering of coach roof.  The hole in the bottom left is for the new solar vent sitting in front of the mast step.  A cowl vent will go on the oppisite side.12/22/13 - Cardboard tray made to sit below hatch area to keep debris out.12/22/13 - West Marine bag used to make a debris catcher below where hole will be drilled for cowl vent.12/22/13 - View of hatch with cardboard tray below.12/23/13 - Placement of pattern for cowl vent base.12/23/13 - Center hole and screw holes drilled.  Screw holes only go through outside layer of fiberglass.12/23/13 - Screw holes were drilled oversize and the foam core dug out about a half inch wider than each hole.  The foam core was also dug out around the large hole back about an inch.12/23/13 - The screw holes have been filled first with a thinner mix of epoxy and adhesive filler to soak into the foam, then a thicker mix of epoxy and sanding filler at the surface.  The Thicker epoxy was also forced into the gap around the larger hole.12/25/13 - The hardened epoxy was sanded flush with the surface and the dege of the center hole.12/25/13 - Screw holes being drilled over the epoxied areas.12/25/13 - All screw holes drilled and area now ready for priming and painting.12/30/13 - Masking hardware prior to painting.12/30/13 - Masking hardware prior to painting.12/30/13 - Masking hardware prior to painting.12/30/13 - Masking hardware prior to painting.1/12/14 - A shot of the deck, forward of the cockpit, with two coats of primer applied.2/2/14 - The coach roof with 3 coats of finish paint and the handrails installed.  The yellowish areas just have primer on them and will be painted with a thickened and textured nonskid paint called Kiwi Grip.2/2/14 - Stern with the engine cooling water/exhaust thru-hull removed, fiberglass patched, filled and sanded.  Because the stern will be painted blue a grey primer will be used.2/2/14 - Stainless steel sheet cut and fitted to where it will be glued down.  The sheeting will protect the deck from the anchor shaft and chain.  The holes just behind the sheeting is where the anchor windlass will be mounted.
Mast
Mast length is 29' 9"Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.Mast before any work on it.3/16/14 - Mast with halyards and bottom shrouds removed.  You can see the top portion of the mast has been cleaned and sealed with a product called Everbrite.3/23/14 - Mast was cleaned with a non-abrasive cleaner (soft scrub) with non-abrasive pad.  For the tough spots I used the cleaner and 1000 grit wet and dry sandpaper wet.  After the cleaning, I used a concentrated cleaner and acid neutralizer that came with the Everbrite.  3/23/14 - I also took apart both mast winches, cleaned them, lubed them and put them back together.
Cockpit Rebuild
2/14/14 - Cockpit Starting State2/14/14 - Cockpit Starting State2/15/14 - New cockpit locker lids cut out and fitted in place.2/15/14 - Old frame for companionway hatch slats removed.2/16/14 - Original Cockpit floor hatch was bolted into place.  This new hatch that will be hinged.  Picture of underside being reinforced with fiberglass over PVC.  Weights ensure hatch lid is flat.2/17/14 - Holes where old engine controls were has been ground to a bevel for fiberglass patch.2/17/14 - Fiberglass patches drawn and ready for cutting.  A friend asked why I made cardboard templates.  They make it quick and easy for me to lay out the patches  so I waste the least amount of fiberglass cloth.2/17/14 - All six layers of fiberglass wetted out with epoxy.  I do this on a plastic covered surface because it’s easier to wet it out evenly.  I use a brush with the bristles cut to make them stiffer. 2/17/14 - After wetting out the surface with epoxy, the patch is put in place and worked smooth with the brush.   This also removes any air pockets.  Once dry it will be filled in with thickened epoxy. 2/17/14 - Old base for the companionway hatch with block of wood to cut the new one from. 2/17/14 - Old base for the companionway hatch with new block of wood and first two cuts. 2/17/14 - Old base for the companionway hatch with new block of wood with final bevel.2/17/14 - New base for the companionway hatch fitted in place. 5/18/14 - Cockpit with cracks/holes filled/repaired and sanded.5/25/14 - Cockpit with 2 coats of primer.5/25/14 - Cockpit with 2 coats of primer.7/20/14 - Cockpit after 2 coats of primer, 1 coat of LP finish paint without flattener and 2 coats with flattener.7/20/14 - Cockpit after 2 coats of primer, 1 coat of LP finish paint without flattener and 2 coats with flattener.8/2/14 - Frame for companionway slats is made from one piece of mahogany for each side and one for the bottom.  The groove for the slats and the outside are painted while the inside will be varnished. 8/2/14 - I also epoxied an aluminum strip to the inside of the groove to add strength.8/2/14 - A shot of the cockpit with the locker lids sitting in place.8/2/14 - A shot of the underside of the locker lid, showing the aluminum support epoxied and screwed in place.  The holes were drilled to provide for hanging line and other dangly things. 8/2/14 - A shot of the Companionway slats cut and installed.  They are made out of Starboard, a plastic lumber that won’t warp, chip or peal the finish.  10/12/14 - The manual bilge pump, traveler, and cockpit locker lids installed.10/12/14 - Shot of tiller as I start to sand off the old finish.10/12/14 - Tiller after being sanded down to bare wood and 10 coats of varnish.
Hull Prep and Painting
10/21/14 - Starboard side of hull sanded back to the trailer bunks.  Front jack stands removed.10/30/14 - Port side of hull sanded back to the trailer bunks.  Front jack stands removed.11/23/14 - Bottom sanded from the stern going forward to the trailer bunks.  The rear jack stands will be removed and the hull sanded, primered, and bottom paint applied so the jack stands can be put back in place and the trailer bunks removed for sanding and painting.10/25/15 - Starboard side of hull primered. 10/29/15 - Starboard side of hull primered. 11/8/15 - First coat of blue topside paint applied.  It was applied using a roller.